Ashland History

The borough is named after Henry Clay’s lush estate near Lexington, Kentucky. Senator Clay was an early supporter and protector of the coal and iron industry in the area. Ashland was the site of Jacob Rodenberger’s old log hotel in 1820. This was the first building in Ashland which was used as a way station on the toll road which passed through Ashland. It was located just behind the Hotel Repellier on Middle Street. Burd S. Patterson, a prominent citizen of the county, had predicted that some day an important mining town would cover the slope of this mountain. In 1845, Patterson with John P. Brock of Philadelphia and James Hart purchased the land to develop Ashland. The Borough of Ashland was formally established in 1857. It subsequently rose to prominence as the coal center which fed the American Industrial Revolution from the Civil War through World War Two. Ashland’s very long Main Street features many fine examples of 19th century architecture which are sentinels to its historical significance. Many of these structure are undergoing restoration and revitalization and are very well preserved.

CatawissaRoad

St. Mauritius And rectory

Welcome To Ashland!

This section will have the WW Munsell article posted that exists on our current site. Do we rekey or can we import the content or a document? Above title should be at the top of the home web page.

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CatawissaRoad
St. Mauritius And rectory

Welcome To AAHPS

AAHPS encompasses the history of Ashland, Gordon, Locust Dale, Lavelle, Fountain Springs, and surrounding areas. We are dedicated to preserving local history through our museum and genealogy library at 316-318 Centre St. Ashland. We also offer programs on different topics presented by knowledgeable guest speakers. These programs are held on the 4th Wednesday of each month at 7:00 p.m. and are open to the public with free admission.